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Russian Pie

stolle interiorStolle Pie Shops, a Russia-based café chain with a firm foothold across Eastern Europe and the U.K., is making a U.S. debut in New York City. Stolle leased some 2,000 square feet of production and retail space in Jamestown Properties’ Falchi Building, in Long Island City, in the New York City borough of Queens. With that production space set to open late this year, the chain is also scoping out some smaller, retail-only sites, with plans to open at least five more shops by the end of next year, according to broker Aaron S. Fishbein, of Winick Realty Group, who negotiated the Falchi Building lease for the tenant.

“We’re going to be doing about five locations in 2015, including this first one, and next year we want to double that number of locations or do even more,” said Fishbein. “Right now we’re looking in Manhattan, Brooklyn and the other New York boroughs. Then we’ll start in New Jersey and beyond in 2016.” The company is interested in expanding beyond the New York area later, Fishbein says.

Like the roughly 50 Stolle shops operating overseas, these new ones will combine hardwood floors, wooden and brass fixtures, leather upholstery and other elements intended to conjure the atmosphere of Russian building interiors from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, according to Irina Belska, a co-owner of the company formed to own and operate the U.S. Stolle shops. Old-world charm is an essential element in the chains shops, providing an inviting backdrop to the handcrafted, intricately decorated pies that fill the display cases, says Belska. “The emotion should be calm, warm—a gorgeous atmosphere,” she said.

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SCT-July 2015-Russian Pie

Winick Realty Group is one of New York’s prominent real estate firms specializing in retail leasing and advisory services.  Over the years, Winick Realty has served a broad range of domestic and global clients, with a strong emphasis on long-term representation and expansion and growth strategies.  Winick Realty Group is highly recognized as a forerunner in the retail real estate market.

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Gearing Up for Growth

sct 01-2014Boutique real estate shops across the U.S. are proving that neither a national footprint nor multidisciplinary services platforms are the only means to serving and retaining retail clients today. “Being a boutique firm allows you to focus and be great at one thing,” said Steven E. Baker, president of Winick Realty Group, New York City. “What separates us from the more-global firms is that we are 100 percent laser-focused on leasing retail space.”

Over the past two years, Winick has added a division devoted to New York’s Long Island, working out of its New York City office, as well as a Cranford, N.J. office that houses both retail and investment sales professionals. The firm serves the five boroughs of New York City, and Long Island and Westchester, plus Connecticut and New Jersey. The firm has plans to expand beyond the U.S. Northeast by the end of this year. “We’re slowly but surely going to be working on a national platform,” Baker said.

For more, download the full article in PDF

SCT-January 2014-Gearing up for Growth

Winick Realty Group is one of New York’s prominent real estate firms specializing in retail leasing and advisory services.  Over the years, Winick Realty has served a broad range of domestic and global clients, with a strong emphasis on long-term representation and expansion and growth strategies.  Winick Realty Group is highly recognized as a forerunner in the retail real estate market.

Life after Borders

In an old Borders at the Emeryville Public Market, in the San Francisco Bay Area, Urban Outfitters will share space with Guitar Center, according to TMG Partners, the property’s developer-managers. In New York City Winick Realty Group brokered a deal for a Duane Reade, which says it will open a store by early this summer in part of the three-level Borders in the financial district. Owner Madison Capital divided the space in two. Duane Reade will occupy half of the ground level space plus the entire upper floor. The remaining space is now being marketed.

“Our first choice would be a fashion retailer,” said Darrell Rubens, executive vice president of Winick, which began marketing the space in March.

For more information, download the full article in PDF

SCT-May 2012-Life after Borders

Suitably Priced

My.Suit Offers Men Affordable, Made-To-Measure Clothes

Are custom suits only for the wealthy? Typically, yes. The cost of a tailor-made, which generally runs between $2,500 and $5,000 (though it can hit $20,000), only makes the average man’s wallet scream for mercy. But in a blow for democracy in the bespoke suit business, New York City-based My.Suit, is making made-to-measure suits accessible, primarily online, at a relatively affordable $495 and delivered in two weeks.

The process begins with a customer walking into the store, getting measured by carefully trained staff, choosing from some 300 fabrics and deciding on the cut and look he wants. Two weeks later the garment is shipped to the store or to his home. Once the measurements and order information are on file, though, there’s no need to revisit the store — future orders can be made online or by phone.

“This is the new way to buy a suit, and no one else has shown me a better way to do it,” said James Hancock, the company’s operations manager.

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SCT_080110_My.Suit

 

HUNK FOOD

ENERGY KITCHEN SERVES FAST FOOD FOR FITNESS FANATICS

Every office has one: The PowerBar-toting health enthusiast who spends his lunch breaks working out, and wouldn’t be caught dead in a burger joint or pizza parlor. Just such gym rats with no time to spare are the target consumers of Energy Kitchen, a New York City-based food chain that promises to “take the thinking out of health” by offering 500-calorie-or-less, protein-packed meals at a fast-food pace. “We’re looking for strip-mall-type locations with complementing business,” said Jamie Rogers, the broker at New York City-based Winick Realty Group who handles leasing for Energy Kitchen. “One of the things we’ve looked for in Manhattan that carries over for the suburbs as well is a Whole Foods or a Trader Joe’s, and gyms.”

For more, download the full article in PDF

SCT_030110_Hunk Food

The Feel Good Store 

New York Institution Ricky’s Plots a Bold Expansion 

What is retail about if not labels? In fact, many a retail chain desires to be a label, in the sense that its brand, its identity, essentially amounts to a label. Not Ricky’s, though. Ricky’s defies labeling. 

This New York City–based chain is, at once, a drugstore, a beauty supply store, a costume store and a novelty store. It draws makeup artists, fashion photographers and college students in roughly equal proportions to sample an array of beauty products. Aisle after aisle is filled with every hair product known to woman or man, from high-end brands like Frederic Fekkai to organically based brands such as ShiKai. “The hot-pink-and-shimmery-green awning and the pop music pumping inside are dead giveaways that these aren’t your ordinary drugstores,” raved New York magazine. On Halloween, the store transforms into a one-stop shop, with costumes of every variety on display, along with the usual sampling of wigs and makeup.  

Brothers Ricky and Todd Kenig started the business in 1988. Now it comprises 23 stores, operating mainly in the New York City area, including a new one that opened in Huntington, N.Y., in October, and a flagship in Miami.  

For more, download the full article in PDF  

SCT_December 2008_Rickys